If your family member has a problem with drugs or alcohol, getting treatment sooner than later is very important. While there will never be a “perfect time” to get professional help, the holiday season makes a lot of sense. Here are a few reasons why seeking treatment this time of year can be a smart move for someone you love.   

New year. New outlook on life.
As the year comes to a close, your family member can literally put the past behind them and begin a new chapter of their lives. Help your loved one see that enrolling in treatment now will enable them to start the coming year on a positive note and reclaim the person they were before addiction. 

Easier to escape.
For most people, taking time off from work or school during the holidays is easier. First, many businesses tend to be slower this time of year and close for major days like Christmas and New Year’s. And, most college students are on winter break for a month, so they would miss fewer days of school.

Stay clear of temptations.
It’s tough to escape parties and indulgences that come with the holiday season. Getting your family member into treatment keeps them safely away from situations where they might be tempted to drink excessively or use drugs.

Wise financial decision.
Since it’s the end of the year, there’s a good chance you’ve met (or close to meeting) your insurance deductible. That means your out-of-pocket costs will be less. So, entering treatment before year end might be a smart financial decision.

Give the gift of hope this season.
Understandably, it might seem easier to wait until after the holidays to help your loved one. However, every day they abuse drugs or alcohol is another day of harm they cause themselves and others. Make a commitment to help them see the positive road ahead and why getting help now is better than waiting.

We’re here for you.
If someone you know has a drug or alcohol addiction, take the first step and give us a call: 888-577-0012. We’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

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